Culture

Tourists Flock to Pre-Opening of Archaeological Park of Early Christian Buildings from Roman City Parthicopolis in Bulgaria's Sandanski

Tourists Flock to Pre-Opening of Archaeological Park of Early Christian Buildings from Roman City Parthicopolis in Bulgaria's Sandanski
Tourists Flock to Pre-Opening of Archaeological Park of Early Christian Buildings from Roman City Parthicopolis in Bulgaria's Sandanski
Tourists Flock to Pre-Opening of Archaeological Park of Early Christian Buildings from Roman City Parthicopolis in Bulgaria's Sandanski
Tourists Flock to Pre-Opening of Archaeological Park of Early Christian Buildings from Roman City Parthicopolis in Bulgaria's Sandanski

 A large number of tourists have visited the soon-to-be-opened Archaeological Park of newly restored Early Christian buildings from the Roman city Parthicopolis in the southwestern Bulgarian town of Sandanski during its Pre-Opening events on October 16-18, 2015.

A short history of Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow

A short history of Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow
A short history of Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow
A short history of Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow
A short history of Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow

Christ the Saviour Cathedral (Храм Христа Спасителя) is the mother cathedra or see of the Russian Orthodox Patriarchate, whose current primate is His Holiness Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and all Russia. The cathedral is located on the north bank of the Moskva River to the immediate southwest of the capital’s Kremlin fortress, where, inside the Dormition Cathedral (Uspenskiy Sobor) all Russian tsars and tsarinas have been crowned and anointed. Christ the Saviour is the tallest Orthodox cathedral in the world, standing at 103 metres (338 feet) above the pavement. The main sanctuary (temple) can fit over 10,000 standing worshipers.

Fr. Dumitru Staniloae: The Cross as a Means of Sanctification and Transformation of the World

October 5 marks the anniversary of the repose of the renowned Romanian theologian Fr. Dumitru Staniloae. His many works include commentaries on the Church Father, a Romanian translation of the Philokalia, and his 1978 masterpiece The Orthodox Dogmatic Theology. Fr. Dumitru endured several years of imprisonment for his faith at the hands of Communists, after which he began to work for the Romanian Holy Synod and often traveled to international conferences to share his theological vision. He reposed in 1993 at the age of ninety.

Below we offer his work on "The Cross as a Means of Sanctification and Transformation of the World" in honor of his memory:

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Through the Cross, Christ sanctified His body—the link with the world. He rejected the temptations sent to Him by the world, that is to taste the pleasures, to satisfy His needs unrestrained or to avoid pain and death. If we, in the same way, ward off the temptations of sin and patiently suffer the pain of death, sanctity can spread from His body to all bodies and throughout the world.

Images Of Mount Athos Through Contemporary Photographers’ Lenses

Images Of Mount Athos Through Contemporary Photographers’ Lenses
Images Of Mount Athos Through Contemporary Photographers’ Lenses
Images Of Mount Athos Through Contemporary Photographers’ Lenses
Images Of Mount Athos Through Contemporary Photographers’ Lenses

The Thessaloniki Museum of Photography (TMP), in collaboration with the Mount Athos Center, present “Mount Athos: lingering between image and photographic gaze” exhibition, as part of the “Words and Images” cycle of the museum.

If It Makes You Happy

In 1998, my family and I were received into the Orthodox Church. I had served as an Episcopal clergyman for 18 years prior to that. I left a large parish with a wonderful staff and tremendous programs. I took up the work of starting an Orthodox mission. Of course, such a life-change creates awkward moments for your friends, colleagues, and former parishioners. What do you say to someone who just chucked a career to start a mission in a warehouse? Perhaps the common expression, typically American, was, “I’m glad you’re doing what makes you happy.” It would have also been beyond awkward had I responded by telling the truth: “Actually, it makes me miserable.” And the difference between their thoughts and mine, their actions and mine, is all the difference in the world. It was a difference that was at the heart of my conversion and it separates Orthodoxy from the modern world.