Science

Saint Peter of Cetinje

Saint Peter of Cetinje
Saint Peter of Cetinje
Saint Peter of Cetinje
Saint Peter of Cetinje

Saint Peter was born in Njegushi, Montenegro on April 1, 1747. He was tonsured a monk and ordained to the diaconate when he was only seventeen. He accompanied his uncle Bishop Basil to Russia the following year in order to study there. His uncle died within a year after arriving in Russia, and so Peter was obliged to return to Montenegro.

The Image of Elder Ambrose of Optina in Dostoevsky's Elder Zosima

The Image of Elder Ambrose of Optina in Dostoevsky's Elder Zosima
The Image of Elder Ambrose of Optina in Dostoevsky's Elder Zosima
The Image of Elder Ambrose of Optina in Dostoevsky's Elder Zosima
The Image of Elder Ambrose of Optina in Dostoevsky's Elder Zosima

The great Russian author Feodor Dostoevsky found in St. Ambrose of Optina not only inspiration for the character of Elder Zosima in Brothers Karamazov—he also acquired peace and repentance in the famous elder’s tiny monastic cell. The following is an overview of Feodor Mikhailovich’s relationship to Elder Ambrose of Optina, who is celebrated today.

How close did Dostoevsky’s Zosima come to Ambrose of Optina? What did the famous author take away from his memorable meeting with St. Ambrose? The well-known Dostoevsky scholar Professor Sergei Vladimirovich Belov (June 23, 1936–November 7, 2019) discusses St. Ambrose as one of the important personages in Feodor Dostoevsky’s life in this chapter from his two-volume encyclopedia entitled, F. M. Dostoevsky and His Circles.1

The writer’s wife, A. G. Dostoevskaya, recalls: “On 16 May 1878, our family was stricken with a terrible misfortune—our youngest son Lyosha [diminutive of Alexei] died <…>. In order to soothe Feodor Mikhailovich at least a little and distract him from his sad thoughts, I asked Vl[adimir]. S. Soloviev, who visited us during those days of our sorrow, to persuade Feodor Mikhailovich to go with him to Optina Hermitage, where Soloviev was planning to go that summer. It was Feodor Mikhailovich’s longtime dream to visit Optina Hermitage….”

Saint Petka of the Balkans, you are glory and praise of Belgrade

   

Saint Petka or Parascheva of the Balkans  (Greek Παρασκευή - Friday)  was an ascetic female saint of the 11th century. She was born in the town of Epibatos (today Selimpaşa) on the shore of the Sea of Marmara between Silivri and Constantinople in Thrace in the half of  X century. She was of Serbian origin, from a wealthy and pious family. She had a brother, whose name was Euthymios, and who took monastic vows when he was very young, and later he was elected for Bishop of Madyta (989-996).

Metropolitan Hilarion: The Lord Gives Each of Us an Opportunity to Get Near the Kingdom of Heaven Here, On Earth

Metropolitan Hilarion: The Lord Gives Each of Us an Opportunity to Get Near the Kingdom of Heaven Here, On EarthOn October 18, 2020, the 19th Sunday after Pentecost, the feast day of the Synaxis of Moscow Saints, Metropolitan Hilarion, Chairman of the Department for External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate, officiated a Divine Liturgy at the Church of Joy Of All Who Sorrow Icon of the Mother of God in Moscow, reports the website of the DECR. At the end of the liturgy, the archpastor delivered a sermon:

“In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit!

I congratulate all of you, dear fathers, brothers, and sisters, on this Sunday.

The Irish Church in the Eighth Century

An ancient Irish monasteryAs in the previous century, one of the main centers of Christianity and culture in Western Europe in the eighth century was Ireland with its relatively small population, which numbered around 250,000 at most.

Irish monks enjoyed indisputable authority among the people. One of its characteristic examples was the declaration of the “laws of the saints”, which were instituted in monasteries and then adopted by the rulers of the numerous kingdoms Ireland was divided into. The first such law was introduced in 697 by St. Adomnan, Abbot of Iona, and became known as “the Law of Adomnan” (“Cain Adomnain”), or “the Law of the Innocents.” It prohibited the killing of women, clerics and children who did not take part in warfare (that is, noncombatants, to put it in modern terms) and perpetrators were exposed to substantial fines. In 734, “St. Patrick’s Law” was enacted, and in 788 “St. Ciaran’s Law” was proclaimed.