Science

First Orthodox christian theologian receive a doctorate in Erskine

On May 4, 2019, John G. Panagiotou became the first Orthodox Christian theologian to receive a Doctorate in the 182-year history of Erskine Theological Seminary in South Carolina. Erskine Seminary was founded in 1837 and is rooted in the Reformed tradition. It is one if the oldest divinity schools in the American South. Dr. Panagiotou’s dissertation is titled The Path to Oikonomia with Jesus Christ as Our Lighthouse: A Study in the Theology of Christian Stewardship.

Holy Saturday

Holy Saturday
Holy Saturday
Holy Saturday
Holy Saturday

On Great and Holy Saturday the Orthodox Church commemorates the burial of Christ and His descent into Hades. It is the day between the Crucifixion of our Lord and His glorious Resurrection. The Matins of Holy Saturday is conducted on Friday evening, and while many elements of the service represent mourning at the death and burial of Christ, the service itself is one of watchful expectation.

Commemoration of Holy Saturday

On Great and Holy Saturday the Church contemplates the mystery of the Lord's descent into Hades, the place of the dead. Death, our ultimate enemy, is defeated from within. "He (Christ) gave Himself as a ransom to death in which we were held captive, sold under sin. Descending into Hades through the Cross ... He loosed the bonds of death" (Liturgy of St. Basil).

Synaxarion: Great and Holy Saturday

Of all the days the Holy and Great Forty Day Fast is the most distinguished, but more than the Holy Forty Day Fast the Holy and Great Passion Week is exalted, and more than the days of Holy Week Great and Holy Saturday is the most exalted. This week is called great not because these days or hours are more exalted but because the great, portentous and extraordinary deeds of our Savior were accomplished during this week, but especially on this day.

Holy and Great Thursday

Commemoration of the Mystical (Last) Supper

And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body. And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Mt. 26:26–28

The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes

The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes
The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem: icons and frescoes

The Entry into Jerusalem is one of the most important events in the last earthly days of our Lord Jesus Christ. The Savior's triumphant arrival at the Holy City on the eve of the Passover preceded His Passion, and was the manifestation of the Old Testament prophecies. The source for the iconography of the Lord's Entry into Jerusalem is the Gospels, where it is related how Christ enters the city seated on the foal of an ass, accompanied by His disciples on the eve of the Judaic Passover, were He will be betrayed to be crucified. The image of the Savior seated on the foal is well known even in early Christian art.